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LPLP Dun POA Filly ?

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POAAnnie
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LPLP Dun POA Filly ?

New to forums... hope I'm doing this right!

 

We have an 11 month old POA filly tested to be LPLP.  She's also obviously DUN, with a prominent dorsal stripe running down through her tail, webbing on her forehead,  barring on all legs, and dark bar across her shoulders.  She has developed POA "Characteristics" of mottled skin, white sclara (though both eyes are partial) and stripped hooves.  She has white sox or stockings on three feet and they are are all stripped.  Her one solid black leg has a solid black hoof.  She also has black spots in her white sox, only visible when wet.   Her body color was born solid dun, as in no visible white or black "appaloosa" spots.  As she sheds out this year we are finding tiny white and black snowflakes on her neck and back so far.

Her sire is 3/4 AQHA 1/4 ApHC and is a "bay" dun with few white and black snowflakes, minimal roaning, white sclara, striped hooves and mottled skin.  However, he also has tall white sox and a wide blaze.  He has thrown one colt with a white belly patch like "splash".   This is not allowed in POA but indicates to me he may have a splash gene hiding?  

Her dam is a POA, chestnut snowcap but also covered in snowflakes and roaning substantially as she ages (only 5).  Also tested LPLP.  

So after all that background info, my question is this:  I'm being told that baby Grace must be a varnish roan because she is LPLP but without Ptn1 or Ptn2.   Also, that because the LP gene is a "command to be white"  that she will ultimately be entirely white except for dark legs and varnish marks.   But I've also read in a few places that LPLP might otherwise be suppressed?  And that some varnish roans only roan very lightly?  I'd love for her to stay dun with minimal roaning and lots of snowflakes.  Just curious if that is possible.  I love figuring out these genetic puzzles!  

 

Daylene Alford
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Some Appaloosa do not roan or

Some Appaloosa do not roan or roan very slowly and the reason for this is not understood.  I'd start by looking at her parents.   Since neither of them appear to be significantly roaned I'd say your chances are fair that she will retain most of her color.  One thing to remember however, is that LPLP horses tend to roan faster/more than LPlp horses so that may affect her.  To what extent?  I can't say.  She might grow snowflakes and she might not, again, I can't say for sure but looking at her parents I'd guess you have a slightly better than 50% shot (due to her being LPLP) of her developing some white on her hips.  

 

Welcome to the forum.

rabbitsfizz
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I'll just add that the mare

I'll just add that the mare has Sabino- it was used a lot by the Appy people as it seems to encourage the expression of the Appy characteristics. The mare is expressing because she is chestnut base and I think the foal is NOT expressing because she is black base, which seems to inhibit expression. The best expressions come on chestnut males (base colour) the least on black based females.  This is tested theory, not proven fact, btw! I have  a black base filly who has sclera round the eye and that is it, but she is a yearling and, when I clipped off the Yak fur I found mottling (big round spots of white) in the flank, jowl and all over ONE side of her nose! There is no rhyme or reason to it, but I can see now that the flecking I thought was just the light, really is flecking. In her case all over. She is not tested but is by a full leopard o/o a black mare that is o/o two full leopards.

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Daylene Alford
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The mare is expressing

The mare is expressing because she is chestnut base and I think the foal is NOT expressing because she is black base, which seems to inhibit expression.

I'm glad you brought that up Rabbit.  Very good point.  The only thing I have to add is that it is not only a theory but has been published in several different studies.  One of them is http://jhered.oxfordjournals.org/content....  There are others but it is mentioned in passing as part of another topic and I'm on the wrong computer to do my pdf searches.  

rabbitsfizz
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Ooh, my theory has been

Ooh, my theory has been proven?

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Daylene Alford
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Yes, there have been several

Yes, there have been several papers that mention that red bases express more white and also that males express more than females.  I'll see if I can't dig up the other papers.

pandemonium